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ABOUT ME

The  mind map  in the background seems confused and disorganized, but it is  fairly representative of my life thus far, 

I am approaching 70 and realize that I have already lived  several rather interesting  lives.  This very personal website is intended as a means to  define who I am, what I do, (what I have done) and what I hope to do in the future.

If you landed here  by chance, we may never become acquainted.  That would be a pity as how are my words going to change the world if I don't get to talk to new people?  So, please, talk to me, check out my books, blog  and Facebook page.

The "About Us" page usually contains some history/biography, so here goes:

I was born in Johannesburg in 1947  to an empty-headed socialite and the Beaverbrook of South Africa.  Reasonably well-educated at an all-girl Anglican school, I quickly lost religion and went on to major in bridge at the University of the Witwatersrand (they kindly gave me a degree in Mathematics and psychology).

Having rejected the careers that were suggested by my guidance counsellors (dentistry and architecture), and unable (for various reasons) to pursue my first career choices (ballet and nursery school teaching) I moved to London in 1973 to study bookbinding at Camberwell School of Art and Crafts (as it was then known).  That led to a 6 month job at the British School at Rome working in their remarkable library.   One thing (a fella named David Whitehouse) led to another and three children later I was working occasionally for another remarkable library at The Corning Museum of Glass.

We thought that the time in Corning might be relatively short, but as it turns out David and the Museum were meant for each other and he worked there, in various capacities, until his death in 2013.

Meanwhile, I brought up the children, looked after a succession of houses and increasingly dense gardens, restored books and dabbled in the book arts. 

Wanting to become  a teacher, I did a Masters degree at Elmira College, but it turned out that New York is a bit xenophobic and will not certify non-citizens.  At the time dual nationality was frowned upon and I was not about to give up my British passport.  So I never had a classroom, but I worked as a tutor for the Migrant Education Outreach Program for about five years, subbed briefly and taught bookbinding, marbling and paper making wherever I could.

Later I became a bookseller with five bricks and mortar locations of various sizes and configurations, plus an extended online presence.  Eventually Barnes & Noble and Amazon prevailed and I took to writing instead. (see Books page)

With the children gone, I took to traveling, often as a volunteer (the zoo in Madagascar, monkeys in South Africa, rescued animals in Costa Rica, kiddy school in Nicaragua).  One way and another this led to a commitment to the environment and a desire to save the world (see Compost, A Better Way, Mayor)